Archive for the ‘Q&A’ Category


Near equator, real monkeys wear shoulder pads

Near equator, real monkeys wear shoulder pads

A Brazilian who first came to the U.S. for college, assistant professor of biology Anita Stone has returned frequently since 2000 to her own northern region of Brazil to watch squirrel monkeys in the forest. The females there pick their mates, and appear to have a weakness for bulked-out upper bodies.

Victory at the big dance

Victory at the big dance

Music and dancing help the Regals volleyball team release tension, and may have been keys to Cal Lutheran’s first NCAA team championship, says head coach Kellee Roesel.

This will be on the test

This will be on the test

After changes to Dominican law and a court ruling revoking citizenship by right of birth, people of Haitian descent face an uncertain future in the Dominican Republic.

For education’s ills, a dose of self-awareness

For education’s ills, a dose of self-awareness

Beginning with this year’s graduates, master’s degree students in counselor education are all embarking on journeys of self-discovery.

Making lemonade

Making lemonade

Terry Spehar-Fahey, who teaches drawing, watercolor and a course titled Art and Psychology, used her painting to emerge from major depression.

There are holes in our buckets

There are holes in our buckets

Everything you can do to save water helps, as long as you start with the big things, explains Andy Pattison, a visiting instructor in the Master of Public Policy and Administration program.

Worth risking

Worth risking

Two graduating biochemistry majors and an international MBA student took the top prizes in CLU’s first Business Design Concept competition, where they pitched ideas for new products and services to a panel of outside judges.

Less coddling, more toddling

Less coddling, more toddling

To understand the epidemic of childhood obesity, assistant professor of exercise science Louise Kelly studies the physical activity of children between 12 and 36 months. Spoiler: there’s not enough of it.

Is ‘common sense’ endangering our planet?

Is ‘common sense’ endangering our planet?

A lot of things keep people from understanding just how bad the global climate crisis is. One of them may be the way the human mind works, says professor of philosophy Xiang Chen.

What is love, anyway?

What is love, anyway?

If professor of psychology Morris N. Eagle, a foremost commentator on the development of psychoanalysis and the theory of attachment, won’t tell us, who will?